The St. Martin Team - Westford MA Real Estate
Westford Massachusetts | 978-935-9500 | Info@StMartinTeam.com



Posted by St. Martin Team on 11/18/2021

Garden edging is an important element of landscaping design that serves many purposes. There are a variety of different materials and techniques for edging, ranging from professional installation to DIY weekend projects. If you’re wondering whether to add garden edging to your outdoor spaces, here are some key benefits to consider:

Defining and Separating Spaces

The obvious visual aspect of garden edging is that it creates a divider between two pieces of the yard. You can use either straight or curved lines to surround flower beds, trees, vegetable gardens and lawns and set them apart from the rest of the space. Not only does this look aesthetically pleasing, it will help you establish traffic flow and set limits.

For example, if you want to avoid damage to your lawn or flowers, defining the edges of pathways will send a more obvious message. Clearly defining what is safe to walk on and what is not will help keep your garden healthy and tidy.

Containing Your Garden

Edging provides some excellent benefits from a pure gardening standpoint as well. If properly installed, garden edging will extend below and above the soil line to create a solid barrier. This barrier can keep away many pests that could harm your plants, and will also keep spreading plants from growing out of control. You can also prevent the spread of weeds with garden edging, keeping your flowers, gardens and lawns free of uninvited guests.

Depending on the material and size of the garden edge you create, you can even discourage larger animals like dogs, cats and deer from trampling your flowers and veggies. This will help prevent cross contamination between different garden beds as well.

Helping You With Maintenance

While it takes some work to install, garden edging will help you with long term landscaping maintenance. Trimming the edges of the lawn is easier when you have a solid line to guide you and you’ll avoid spreading grass into the flower beds that you’d need to clean up later. Any plants around the edges of the garden are a lot less likely to be damaged by mowing, weeding or general yard traffic which means you won’t have to replace them as often. This, combined with the bonus of keeping pests and weeds away, means more time for you to spend on other things.

Improving Your Garden’s Appearance

Garden edging can be just as visually pleasing as practical. With the many materials and techniques available for edging, you can create a beautiful aesthetic and benefit your plants. Some edging can create contrast by drawing bold lines between parts of your lawn, while others can stay neutral. Neutral-colored edging will give colorful flowers and foliage a perfect backdrop to stand out against. Not to mention, in protecting your lawn, pathways and garden beds from damage and pests you’ll be improving the look of your entire yard.

Garden edging can be incredibly beneficial to a landscape. Along with the visual appeal it’s also helpful in maintaining a successful garden. With the wide variety of edging materials available, you’re sure to find something that will fit your aesthetic and practical needs.





Posted by St. Martin Team on 12/17/2020

 Photo by Matt Chen on Unsplash

When you’re creating a landscaping plan for your home it is essential to design around the local climate and weather patterns. When you opt for plants that thrive in your area, you know they are well equipt to handle the seasonal changes specific to your location. This adaptation makes them easier to care for and less dependent on extra watering. It is especially important to integrate this kind of landscaping when there is some level of drought occurring where you live. 

What to Keep

Drought tolerant landscaping is a beautiful way to save on water usage. The good news is that creating a more drought-tolerant yard doesn't necessarily mean removing all of the plantings you currently have. 

Large trees are a great asset, plan on keeping those. Well placed trees provide shade for your home and garden which can be an energy saver all year long. Shade trees also allow a diverse variety of plants to grow comfortably and provides nesting habitat for birds and other native wildlife. 

A drought-tolerant landscape typically includes little to no grass. Grass requires regular watering to keep it green and thriving. Lawn watering can be expensive and seasonally limited by the town or city where you reside. Opting to replace even a section of your lawn with a rock garden or wildflowers is guaranteed to reduce your water bill.

What to Add

Focus on plants local to your area. These plants have evolved to handle the local climate and will have the best chance of growing with little to no input from you. In general, using rocks or wood pellets instead of grass for ground covering will serve you well. Try lava rock to cut down on erosion and help the soil retain more water. Install ground cloth under the rock bed or add mulch to curb weed growth and protect your native plants from insects. For an added boost for your plantings, add compost to your soil before the mulch.

Irrigation

An irrigation system could be a helpful addition to your landscape because it allows you to control where and how much you’re watering. If you have an irrigation system in place be sure to have it serviced regularly, especially if you have made changes to the plantings or green areas in your yard. 

If you’re considering installing a new system, an efficient option is a grey-water system. Grey-water irrigation allows for the reuse of water from your in-home sinks, washing machines, showers, and bathtubs to water your plants.

The right landscaping can boost your curb appeal and property value to the next level. Ask your real estate agent for their advice and professional landscaper recommendations in your area.





Posted by St. Martin Team on 7/28/2016

Growing your own vegetables is a wonderful thing. You get to choose which seeds to sow, spend time outside, put in some hard work and then reap the rewards all summer and fall. In spite of this, many new gardeners find themselves planting too much or too little of different vegetables. There's much appeal to going to the store to pick out seeds. It almost seems like magic: these little seed packets will turn into baskets full of food, all for just a few dollars. Follow these tips to learn how to grow what you want the first time around so you won't find yourself begging neighbors to take all those extra zucchinis off your hands. What do you like to eat? Experimenting with new recipes is great. And so is the temptation when you see seed packets for an exotic vegetable you've never tried before. But before you dedicate a whole row of your garden to hybrid turnips, think about whether or not you'll really eat all of that. Instead, plant the veggies you and your family love to eat consistently. Before you start planting, think carefully about the amount of space you have in your garden (I usually draw a diagram and label the rows). This is going to involve some necessary research on your part. If you love summer squash, you may think you need a whole row. Squash plants, however, tend to creep outwards vigorously, producing a ton of fruit and also encroaching on other rows if you're not careful. Similarly, you may find that you simply don't have enough room for some vegetables. We all love the first sweet corn of the season, but most of us don't have enough room in our backyard gardens to feasibly grow corn. Plan for next year Once you've tilled the soil, planted the seeds, and taken care of your plants all spring, you may think the only thing left to do is harvest the vegetables. This is a crucial time, however, to think about next year. What did you have too much of? Too little? Did you find that some vegetables simply wouldn't grow in your garden? (I tried twice, with little luck, to plant pole beans but found that they just didn't like my soil.) Take note of these findings for next year. If one part of your garden receives more sunlight, try rotating crops to see if you get different results. Don't worry if your garden isn't perfect the first time around. In fact, it's best to just let go of that image of the perfect garden. Tending a garden isn't another chore to cause stress in your life, it's a simple and relaxing way to get outside more.  







Tags